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Classic Hockey Quotes
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The Slash of '72:

"To me, that was the low point of the series. If Clarke hits him with a body check and knocks him out, that's fair and square. To go out and deliberately try to take somebody out, there's no sportsmanship in that."

"To me, it's the same as shooting a guy in the hallway. Clarke was probably the only guy on the whole team that would have done it. We had a lot of tough guys on that team but there weren't many guys who played hockey that way. We had guys who would stand up and look you right in the eye, punch you in the nose if you had a fight, but I don't think they would bushwhack. But that's the way Clarke was as a player, and that's the team he's put together down in Philadelphia. That's been his trademark. But it's a free country."

- Canadian hockey hero Paul Henderson recalls the historic 1972 series between Canada and the USSR. Valery Kharlamov, widely regarded as the best Soviet player, missed game seven and was ineffective in game eight after a slash to the ankle from Canada's Bobby Clarke. (Canadian Press, Sept. 16)

"I think it's improper to criticize a teammate 30 years later. If it was so offensive why didn't he bother to say something after the game? I'm surprised at him because we were a true team. Thirty years ago, we put forth the ultimate team performance. I thought it was foolish for him to say that. It doesn't hurt me, but I don't understand why he would bring it up now."

"Listen, I never brag about what I did to [Kharlamov]. The only time I talk about it is when I'm asked."

- Bobby Clarke responds. (Toronto Globe and Mail, Sept. 19)

"I called Clarke over to the bench, looked over at Kharlamov and said, 'I think he needs a tap on the ankle.' I didn't think twice about it. It was Us versus Them. And Kharlamov was killing us. I mean, somebody had to do it. And I sure wasn't going to ask Henderson."

- John Ferguson, an assistant coach with Team Canada '72, claims credit for the whole thing. (Calgary Sun, Sept. 20)

"If I hadn't learned to lay on a two-hander once in a while, I'd never have left Flin Flon."

- Bobby Clarke, in 1972. (Canadian Press, Sept. 16)

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