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Your Fantasy Hockey League Made Simple
A quick and easy fantasy hockey format
 Related Resources
• Ten Tips For Success in Fantasy Hockey
• Fantasy Hockey Resources
 
  1. For starters, decide how your fantasy hockey teams will be picked. There are two reliable methods:

    - Get everyone together for an afternoon and hold a draft. Have team owners draw lots to decide the draft order and start picking players. Strike each NHL player from the master list as he is selected. It's a good idea to reverse the order after each round (in a ten-team pool, whoever picks tenth in round one picks first in round two).

    - If you can't all be in the same room, simply ask team owners to submit a list of picks. In this format, players can be shared among teams: if everyone wants Alex Ovechkin they can all have him. The rosters will still be very different.

  2. Stick to a basic and comprehensible formula. Pick ten players each, including at least two defensemen and one goalie. (Adjust roster sizes according to the size of your league). Skaters are credited with goals and assists. Goalies get two points for a win and two extra points for a shutout. This allows everyone to browse the summaries each morning and get a reasonable idea of how they did in last night's games. It also makes life much easier for the stats keeper.

  3. Wait until the second or third week of the NHL season before making your picks. This will give everyone a chance to start thinking hockey and allow some flexibility in selecting a draft day or deadline for roster submissions.

  4. How do you want to do the math? For as little as 20 bucks you can find an online service to calculate your stats and post them on a website (check the Fantasy Hockey Page). If you do your own numbers, be prepared to spend an evening with a calculator every couple of weeks or so. Ideally, your owners will want updated standings every week.

  5. Hold one or more re-drafts during the season. The biggest danger in a simple fantasy hockey league is that a couple of great teams jump out to an early lead and nobody catches them. The re-draft allows everyone to get back in contention. Allow each team to ditch up to half of its players and pick up replacements. Make sure the replacement players only start counting points for their new teams from the day of your re-draft, not from the start of the season.

  6. Enforce a roster shake-up or two. If you really want to throw it open, you can require that each team drop half its players for each re-draft. That will renew interest, give the long season a couple of extra twists, and give the bottom-feeders a chance.

  7. Divide the Monopoly money and award several prizes throughout the season. Select a week in mid-season and award a few bucks to the team with the most points in that week. Honor the first-place team before you do a re-draft. If you have lots of cash in the pot, think of a few more "games within the game" to add a little spice to the season (maybe a "fight week," with 20 bucks going to the team that records the most fighting majors).

  8. Don't include the playoffs. That's a seperate pool.

  9. Of course, the biggest prize is reserved for your overall October-to-April champion, along with the right to be smug and insufferable for the entire off-season.

 

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